Is North Korea Really A Dictatorship?

Is North Korea Really A Dictatorship?

Writing in pravdareport.com , Costantino Ceoldo provides insights into the nature of the North Korean government and explains Washington’s responsibility for North Korea’s determination to possess nuclear weapons. Washington has kept a state of war with North Korea open for 64 years and continues to overthrow governments that have policies independent of Washington.

Some ideas about North Korea

Costantino Ceoldo

A Dictator is a transient and temporary figure in the life of a Nation. When power passes from father to son to nephew, we can no longer speak of dictatorship. In such a case it is more correct to speak of monarchy and ruling dynasty to describe the situation in which the power over a people is administered by the same family, continuously, through the generations.

From this point of view, the current ruler of North Korea is king and not dictator. In fact, Kim Yong-Un inherited the power from his father Kim Jong-Il, who in turn had inherited it from his father, Kim Il-Sung. Kim is therefore a well-established dynasty in North Korea, a bloodline whose male members reign over the country until death and enjoy in the eyes of the common people even a form of deification, thanks to skillful political propaganda and perhaps to a certain inclination of the North Korean soul.

A monarchy needs an aristocratic class that supports it and aids control of the territory. If it is easy to identify the royal family, identifying the elements of the aristocracy can be more complicated. However, we can perhaps find the aristocracy in the managers of the large industrial plants, in state-owned farms; among those responsible for the maintenance of the roads, electric and telecommunications network, and the most prestigious university professors. Depending on the names and the frequency with which the managers are replaced in their assignments, we could deduce a scheme that helps us to understand something about the internal mechanisms of power and therefore about the structure of the North Korean aristocratic class.

Then there is the military apparatus that is always the instrument with which a government, even the most “democratic”, maintains control over the population and the territory, while at the same time parrying possible external attacks. North Korea is no difference from this point of view.

If someone asked me then what North Korea is, I would answer that it is a country with a communist economy, governed by a monarchy that is helped in its governance by a political council with representatives of both the armed forces and a noble class of apparatchiks.

The rule of the Kim family is justified by its resistance to the Americans. The end of hostilities on the battlefield in 1953 and the creation of the demilitarized zone in the 38th parallel did not lead to the end of the war but to its indefinite suspension thanks to the longest truce in human history: 64 years. The state of war between the two Koreas (and between North Korea and the Western coalition that attacked it) still remains today. Between the parties to the conflict, there is an armistice, not a peace treaty. However, it can be said that Washington did not win the Korean War while North Korea did, at least as long as it continues to exist as a sovereign nation.

North Korea suffered immense sufferings during the war. The amount of bombs that the Americans dropped on North Korea was larger than they dropped on the entire Eastern theater of World War II, by their own admission and boast. The Americans spared nothing and even scattered anthrax on the border between North Korea and China, to hit the herds and starve the populations. However, the Korean people resisted, and they still resist today.

The way to end the conflict and North Korea’s need for nuclear weapons is to sign a peace treaty and remove the sanctions and threats against North Korea. That Washington has followed a contrary policy for 64 years suggests that Washington intends to keep the conflict alive. North Korea is another “enemy” that the US military/security complex can use to terrify Americans into continued support of the large US military budget.

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